March 24: Installation and Conceptual Art

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Ahoy, ahoy!

Conceptual art,as well as installation art, can be confusing for some people. Heck, even I find it confusing sometimes.  This is one of the reasons why I find this youtube video both hilarious and thought provoking:

The idea of adding false labels to everyday objects within a museum setting makes me smile, but it also encourages me to think about what exactly is being presented to us?  Is the intent of the false labelling to encourage us to reflect on what we believe conceptual art is to be?  Is it making a mockery of conceptual art?  Or is it presenting an idea of guerilla art, the idea of putting false art into a museum to see if people believe and accept it a credible work, solely based on the presence of a label?  Evidently the artists here see this as a project, not a prank, and they carry out this work at more than one museum worldwide.  The work is credited to an artist or a group of artists called Tiny Arrow.  I searched on the Internet for more information about their work but couldn’t find any.  However, the video in itself does a pretty good job on its own.  In a sense, this installation or alteration or addition of existing work was also a performance.  We see the artists intervening with the surroundings in order to place the false labels, we see the reactions of people around them.It is also largely based on conceptual art, so beginning with the MoMA seems natural to me.

The first piece at the MoMA is a drinking fountain.  This appealed to me especially because I visited the MoMA this past November.  While we were there, a student from the Mount Allison group broke a sink.  The first thing I asked my classmate who delivered this bit of gossip to me?

“Wait, so was the sink a display or in the bathroom?”

And of course, because it’s the MoMA, the sink had been on display in part of an installation about Tupperware and the American kitchen.

That’s all!

Brit

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February 15th: How To Effectively Show Video and Film

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Ahoy, ahoy!

I’ve gotten a bit behind on my blog entries, as the last week before the break was a rather hectic one!  Nevertheless, I have some time to make it up now.  On the fifteenth of February, we had a rather relaxing class, as we viewed a bunch of different videos and talked about the importance of the National Film board.

This class was obviously different in structure than normal, because we do not often sit for the full time and watch videos.  Not surprisingly, this was actually unintentional, as what was previously scheduled for that class had to be rescheduled.  As we sat and watched videos that varied greatly in content and construction, I began thinking about what the best way to show video is.  I have been in art galleries before that have had videos playing, and I do not always watch the entire thing.  If I come in during the middle of the video, will I even be able to understand what is going on in the piece?  Also, if I begin watching it, will I be sitting for 2 minutes or 2 hours?  I don’t believe it is very effective to show videos in galleries, but then where else are people supposed to go to view these works?  The National Film board website gives you access to either whole films or trailers, and you can buy some DVD’s of the works, but is this the only option?

I suppose another option for showing film would to have scheduled viewings, much like a film festival.  I know that last semester, the Sackville Film Society was showing experimental shorts before the feature presentation.  Perhaps this is an effective way of getting an audience for your work?  Additionally, sometimes the National Film board puts these videos/films on television.  If the film is short, this could be another way of getting an audience for the work.  We briefly discussed this problem in class, but it really got me thinking.  On my own personal exploration of the National Film board website, I certainly did not watch each and every film.  Some films I started and then stopped.  Having everything on a website makes it accessible, to be sure, but just because it is accessible does not mean it is being accessed as often as the artist would like.

This is the film I liked best on the National Film board website.

http://www.nfb.ca/partial/player/popout/35741/?ct=0

Maybe personal media sharing, such as blogging, is another way to get word out about particular films?

That’s all!

Brit